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New Karesansui

Started by patch, January 24, 2017, 12:41:02 pm

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edzard

.... and so it missed the opportunity to become a dobei clay wall with a wee roof .. ...

kabuki999

yepp... better luck next time 'round on the Samsara merry-go-round... Little Wattle Fence...
gosh, that sounds like Elmer Fudd... sorry, I'll stop, didn't mean to troll this up...
kabuki999

patch


kabuki999

 ;D ...but ... isn' that supposed be spelled bewwy and wascals ?  ;)

Anyway, so long Elmer, along with the little wattle...  fence.... (no, not snake, but fence...)  and back to garden designs...

I am really curious, Patch - and /or anybody else who is in a similar situation- how one defines boundries, asserts proportions on large pieces of land that you are doing on your own... how do you arrive at divide, or unite....  I only have experience with basically a backyard conversion to a Japanese inspired garden... with all the narrowing of options, the typical (or atypical) compromises that this means... so I don't know, what the abundance of possibilities really implies... is it freedom, or a burden - I expect it's both... (?)     
kabuki999

patch

Yes. Auto spell check fixed everything...

patch

Kabuki, My decision for the overall size of the garden was not so much restricted by physical barriers. The incline at the back of the garden going uphill begins to get steep three or so feet beyond the back of the top stepping stone of the stairs left of the waterfall. So that creates a  physical challenge to plant, work and maintain. Also the depth of the garden at that same line is at a distance where details are difficult to distinguish at least for me. The parameters for the garden going right to left or left to right are restricted on one side by a gravel parking area and on the other side by the corner of the house. I am aware that having a predetermined space to design and build is probably preferred however as mentioned above I had set boundaries (consciously) . Also taking into consideration the size of a space I could maintain and the amount of material I could afford to build it. Patch

don

Wondering if this topic should be split off and moved to a different forum category?

I agree with Patch.

And evaluating the land, the needs present and future, and budget are basic considerations.  By example, there is a project nearby that includes as much as an acre of Japanese garden, but is broken down into phases in consideration of priority and resources.  This garden makes use of existing grades and natural features.

A garden may also start with nearly a blank slate as many corporate gardens do - earth is moved and contoured - thereby creating a whole new topography and scene stage.  $$$$!

don

Patch - that would be "wascals."

I admit having not read the considerably abundant posts completely but one small suggestion.  Given that your photo point is your main viewpoint, consider tilting the stones ever so slightly so that the tenba, or flat top of stones toward the viewer so that the back edge is completely visible.  It will not make the stone feel imbalanced but will give a positive force and feeling of comfort.  Experiment with one or two to see if this works for you.

patch

nobedan extended and relayed. more pic to come. Opinions are welcome. Patch

patch

slightly more upright view

patch

view from opposite side with "Poet stones"

patch

nobedan with local clay and mortar test.

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