Appendix B: Numeral Influences

One of the earliest terms used to identify a garden in the Japanese language is niwa 庭. The term is Jōmon (c.10,000-300BCE) in origin, and referred to the vast and varied territory that the hunter-gatherers roamed in search of food. Although the people were nomadic in theory, there is archaeological evidence that they erected semi-permanent thatched dwellings, and these may well have acted as central depots from which foraging parties disseminated

Appendix D: Gardens Cited

One of the earliest terms used to identify a garden in the Japanese language is niwa 庭. The term is Jōmon (c.10,000-300BCE) in origin, and referred to the vast and varied territory that the hunter-gatherers roamed in search of food. Although the people were nomadic in theory, there is archaeological evidence that they erected semi-permanent thatched dwellings, and these may well have acted as central depots from which foraging parties disseminated

Appendix C: Common Flora

One of the earliest terms used to identify a garden in the Japanese language is niwa 庭. The term is Jōmon (c.10,000-300BCE) in origin, and referred to the vast and varied territory that the hunter-gatherers roamed in search of food. Although the people were nomadic in theory, there is archaeological evidence that they erected semi-permanent thatched dwellings, and these may well have acted as central depots from which foraging parties disseminated

Appendix A: Traditional Measures

One of the earliest terms used to identify a garden in the Japanese language is niwa 庭. The term is Jōmon (c.10,000-300BCE) in origin, and referred to the vast and varied territory that the hunter-gatherers roamed in search of food. Although the people were nomadic in theory, there is archaeological evidence that they erected semi-permanent thatched dwellings, and these may well have acted as central depots from which foraging parties disseminated

X
- Enter Your Location -
- or -