Japanese Gardening Organization

Resources for Japanese Gardening 日本の園芸
Sharing the benefits of Japanese gardening for individuals, groups, communities and society.
Providing resources to foster the exchange of culture, knowledge, appreciation and application of Japanese gardening.
Striving for the highest level of accurate information and resources for Japanese gardening.

The Japanese Gardening Organization is an international non-profit organization spreading the benefits of Japanese gardening for individuals, groups, communities, and society. Help continue this mission with your gift of support.

The Japanese Gardening Organization proudly presents:

A JAPANESE GARDEN HANDBOOK - Volumes II through V

The dry landscape at Meigetsu-in, Kamakura.

Current supporters of JGO at the $100 or more now have advanced access to the entire “A Japanese Garden Handbook” online. The additional eleven chapters of Part II are available immediately, and the remaining volumes are being posted over the next few weeks.  If you have supported JGO at the $100 level or higher, please contact us for immediate access.  If you wish to contribute at this level and access the complete handbook, contact us at development@japanesegardening.org.

Although the shear volume and photography in this work made a printed version too costly, this format keeps with the ultimate goal of a Japanese garden ‘WIKI’ - a dynamic and ever-evolving resource like no other.  This is a wonderful development and certainly a fitting application of Andrew’s work.  And with this WIKI format, we hope to see members submit more content and additions to be considered.

  • Part Two: Essential Elements (laying out the use of the elemental materials of a Japanese garden: Stone, water, & plantings)
  • Part Three: Ancillary Elements (elements that make a garden peculiarly Japanese: Paths, bridges, lanterns, water basins, & stone towers; architecture, gates, walls, fences & borrowed scenery)
  • Part Four: Culture and Context (covering religious, philosophical, geomantic & cultural influences)
  • Part Five: Historical Canvas (providing a brief but useful historical overview)

Japanese Gardening Organization Partner News:

Japanese Garden Calendar

An image by Kenneth Wendall Jackson of Hilo was selected by photography contest juror Alvis Upitis to appear on the cover of a 2017 calendar of images captured in Lili`uokalani Gardens.

“Every show distills out a single image that represents the body of work and draws the viewer in for more,” said Upitis. “Angel Crossing” was that iconic image for me. Like a movie still frame, it asks from me a soundtrack, perhaps “Aloha `Oe” played on grand piano.”  “Angel Crossing” appears on the cover of the first Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens photo calendar and as the main image for the month of June. Another of Jackson’s images, “Winter Day 3,” was selected for the month of November.

Kenneth W. Jackson took his first photograph at the age of 8. He spent 37 years running a successful photography business on the mainland. His work experience is in the U.S. Navy as well as in utility services, soils and concrete testing, and sewer main inspection for several mainland companies. He moved to Hilo in May 2013.  Juror Alvis Upitis is a working commercial photographer with 40 years experience shooting for Fortune 500 companies and top advertising agencies worldwide. He has BS and MFA degrees in photography. He taught photo art and techniques at the college level for 10 years.  The contest attracted 90 entries for a 13-month calendar. Images not chosen for the main month page went through a second selection for potential inclusion as a thumbnail image. In all, 39 different views of the gardens are included in this first Friends of Lili`uokalani calendar competition.

“We are thrilled with the quality of images selected,” said Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens president K.T. Cannon-Eger. “So much so that a separate display of calendar contest winners will appear in the Banyan Gallery Saturday, January 14, from noon until 6 p.m. as part of the Banyan Drive Art Stroll.”

“We owe deep gratitude to photo calendar juror Alvis Upitis for bringing his professional expertise to a difficult selection process,” said photographer and videographer Kenneth Goodrich of Volcano, who organized the competition.  Goodrich of Hawaii Photo Retreat also is the calendar’s graphic designer. Printing and production was done locally by Hawaii Printing Corporation.

Jackson will receive the grand prize of a ride along with Mick Kalber and Bruce Omori from Paradise Helicopters. Prize presentation will take place at 2:00 p.m. at the Banyan Gallery.  Other photographers featured in the calendar and the month of their image are: Paul Miyasaki for “Lili`uokalani Nene” (January), K.T. Canon Eger for “Nagasaki Lion Picnic” (February), Kornelius Schorle for “Walk With Me” (March), Steve Godzsak for “Nature’s Shapes n Colors” (April), Alan Lakritz for “The Bridge of Tides” (May), Toby Hazel for “Tea Room View” (July), Debra L Newbery for “Bamboo Pagoda” (August), Steve Pollard for “Wahine Hula” (September), Alan Lakritz “Hilo Bay Serenity” (October), Valerie A. Victorine for “Lili`uokalani Shrine” (December), and Vernon L. Enriques for “All the Park” (January 2018)

Copies of the fund raising calendar will be sold to benefit projects in Lili`uokalani Gardens. For more information, please refer to the Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens Facebook page.  For more information, contact K.T. Cannon-Eger at (808) 895-8130.

Japanese Gardening Organization Special Report:

Japanese Koi declared Illegal?

Spain joins the ranks of the state of Maine, USA and regions of Australia in banning the sale and possession of Japanese Koi.  Member and Japanese garden advocate, Carla Amorim, tells us of a new law recently published in Spain that classifies Koi fish as a dangerous invasive species. Carla explains that this means that possessing, breeding, selling or transporting Koi is illegal and punishable by law. 

The Japanese Garden Organization urges the officials in Spain to take a second look at what may have been hastily written legislation that does not take into consideration the differences in carp species, the economic benefit of koi breeding and sales businesses, the cultural importance of koi to treasured landscapes, etc.

The Japanese Gardening Organization believes that koi carp are at least no more of a threat to the environment and native species of any region than the hundreds of millions of feral dogs and cats around the world. We believe it is easier to responsibly own, raise and care for koi than most species legally classified as pets.  A platform has been created to appeal to the authorities to consider Koi a domestic animal like many others that can be registered, and to hold their owners responsible just as they are for their other domesticated animals, and prevent them from being released in the wild.  The petition can be accessed here Change.org.  Carla Amorim provides a translation here Koi declared illegal translation.

 

Spirit & Health

 

MAINTAINING A ‘ZEN’ GARDEN is a soothing activity. The calming and meditative practice might be appropriate for a patient dealing with an illness, with one caveat: raking the gravel in the garden can be physically demanding, more so if one’s energy is diminished by illness. What if the patient is physically unable to visit the garden?  The University of Florida’s Shands Hospital and Arts in Medicine are crossing these barriers in BEYOND THESE WALLS: EXPANDING THE PATIENT EXPERIENCE.

2016-07-03

A Word from the Board of Directors

 

Dear Friend of JGO,

adeane-2016cropMy name is Andrew Deane, and I am a newly-elected director here at the Japanese Gardening Organization. However, I am not new to JGO’s web site, which I first discovered about a decade ago after I moved to Tokyo. Like you, I have a deep and abiding passion for Japanese gardens and Japanese gardening, which in my case was first kindled in the mid-nineties when I traveled to Japan to work as a language instructor. Since then, I have sought opportunities to visit Japanese gardens whenever and wherever I travel, and I have been gradually constructing my own Japanese garden in a quiet suburb of Tokyo. I get such gratification every time I add a new tree or an old stone lantern, and recently I was as giddy as a schoolboy as I watched gardeners add major stonework and a dry pond to my little patch of earth. Like you, I read all the books I can get my hands on, and I visit the best web sites devoted to the field. There are hundreds of such sites on the Internet, but quality sites are not a dime a dozen. Nor do they sprout spontaneously and flourish without effort, energy and support. It is about this latter point which I would like to speak to you today.

The Japanese Gardening Organization was established in 2001 to advance the understanding and appreciation of Japanese gardening and to spread the benefits of Japanese gardening for individuals, groups, communities, and society. It is a non-profit organization run by volunteers featuring resources developed or written voluntarily by professionals and experienced amateurs. Ours is indeed a bold mission, but it is one that we here at JGO take very seriously. We believe that you do too, or you would not be frequenting the web site.

We strive to provide you with resources at all levels and in all categories, and our Forums assure a steady stream of input from a thousand professionals and amateurs on all manner of subjects related to Japanese gardens. In the last year alone, there have been around 800,000 forum page views, and 132 new topics have been added. Several articles on dry landscape gardening and the benefits of gardens to health and the spirit were added to the “Theory and Design” section. The World Japanese Garden Database now holds more than 100 garden references worldwide and continues to grow. Reviews of publications related to Japanese gardens and gardening were also entered into our “Publications” database. These resources continue to provide you with accurate and inspirational information on Japanese gardening.

I would like to single out the addition of Part 1 of A Japanese Garden Handbook, which was added to the organization’s web site in January 2016. I am grateful to the Japanese Gardening Organization for the opportunity to make my research available to a wider public audience, and I look forward to releasing the remaining four parts shortly. Herein lies one of the chief reasons for supporting JGO: the organization values the highest level of accurate and dependable information, and so do you.

So, how will we use your donation? The maintenance of any organization requires ongoing financial commitment, and for a non-profit organization run entirely by volunteers, this means that almost all such financing must come from sponsorship and public support. JGO maintains a web site which incurs annual domain fees and sundry monthly running costs. Regular planned expansion of this site requires upgrading software and hardware and paying additional annual and monthly fees. If you have not already made a donation, please make a secure online gift today by clicking the Donate button above, or send a check to: Japanese Gardening Organization, 7306 N Vandiver Rd, San Antonio, Texas, 78209.

In closing, I would like to extend my general gratitude on behalf of all the directors, honorary directors and advisors here at JGO for you continued interest in this organization, and my particular gratitude for your financial pledge. Your contribution means that we can continue to add material of the very highest caliber to our web site and to fulfill our mission for the mutual benefit of anyone anywhere who shares our passion for Japanese gardens and Japanese gardening.

All the very best,

Andrew R. Deane
Board Director
Tokyo, Japan

The Japanese Gardening Organization proudly presents:

 

A JAPANESE GARDEN HANDBOOK

The dry landscape at Meigetsu-in, Kamakura.

by Andrew R. Deane

PART ONE:  DESIGN & CRAFT is the first of 5 parts in this comprehensive work on Japanese Gardens.  Here we explore the aesthetics, artistic principles, garden types, designers, builders, and the transference of this knowledge.  JGO will be presenting the remaining parts as discussion topics in both dynamic online formats (see WIKI in the link below) and live interactive events.  See Part One below:

 

A JAPANESE GARDEN HANDBOOK

Pushing The Line – A Theoretical Approach to Raking a Karesansui Garden

Daitokuji

“Daitokuji” copyright 2005 datigz and made available under an Attribution-Non-Commercial Share Alike Licence 2.0

Imagine that someone has wiped clean the pattern in the gravel at Ryoanji and handed you the rake with the instructions, “Make whatever pattern you think best.”  What pattern would you rake? What patterns wouldn’t you dare to rake, and why not? What would you do in this situation?

In Part II of the treatise on raking the sands of karesansui, Martin McKellar and Andrew R. Deane describe a journey of discovery, both personal and professional, in pursuit of understanding the meaning and methods of raking the sands of karesansui.

 Read More

JGO welcomes submissions of articles and essays for consideration.   Send to development@japanesegardening.org.

See also the article on a private Japanese garden under

the FEATURE PROJECT tab.

The Japanese Garden of Terry Gerlach

Terrys Japanese Garden

Besides participating in Japanese Gardening Organization’s forums and managing the event calendar, Terry also volunteers for Portland’s Japanese Garden and is an avid Japanese gardener himself.  In the late 1990’s, he was presented with what he refers to as “an opportunity” when construction on a nearby road destroyed his entire landscape.  Take a tour of Terry’s garden and watch a short video on the maintenance of his garden at The Japanese Garden of Terry Gerlach.

The Portland Japanese Garden’s new International Institute for Japanese Garden Arts and Culture

This is a new educational initiative at the garden, launching in 2017. The Institute teaches the traditional skills and techniques for creating and stewarding Japanese gardens for future generations while also acquainting students with the heart and soul of aesthetics at the root of Japanese garden design, construction and maintenance.  Here is information about the 2017 Waza to Kokoro training seminar:
2017 Seminar Information 1

ABOUT THE SEMINAR
This 12-day event is the first seminar of the Portland Japanese Garden’s International Institute for Japanese Garden Arts and Culture and is part of the three-level Waza to Kokoro training program.

Preliminary dates: August 25-September 5, 2017
Application deadline: Dec. 30, 2016
Content: Design module, garden history lectures, stone workshop, tea sessions and garden clinic
Level and requirements for participation: Intermediate
Capacity: 16 participants
Instructors: Garden staff, visiting garden artisans from Japan, visiting U.S. academics
Who can apply: Primarily professionals from Japanese gardens, but application is also open to experienced landscape professionals as well as students of landscape-related disciplines

ABOUT THE INSTITUTE
The International Institute for Japanese Garden Arts and Culture teaches the traditional skills and techniques for creating and stewarding Japanese gardens for future generations while also acquainting students with the heart and soul of aesthetics at the root of Japanese garden design, construction and maintenance. The Institute provides instruction to help meet design, construction and maintenance needs of Japanese gardens serving communities across North America, with a low student-teacher ratio that allows for individual consultation. The three-tier Waza to Kokoro training program is the Institute’s main program, but the Institute also hosts short master-level workshops, public lectures by prominent writers and lecturers, and other programs.

MORE INFORMATION:


December 11, 2016: 

Japanese Gardening Forum membership reaches 1000 members worldwide!

Image result for fireworks Japan

 


Sharing Culture, Creating Community: Celebrating Descanso's Japanese Garden at 50

Southern California  Workshop & Garden Tour  

January 14 and 15, 2017  |  Descanso Gardens, La Canada Flintridge, CA

Southern California is home to a number of outstanding Japanese gardens that pays homage to the rich history of Japanese - American cultural presence in the area while honoring California’s native landscape, horticultural legacy and ethos of innovation, sustainability and love of the outdoors.   The North American Japanese Garden Association, in cooperation with Descanso Gardens, explores the Japanese garden experience in Southern California in a two-day regional event featuring hands-on workshops, an exhibition, lectures on horticulture and history and expert-led tours of five Asian gardens.  

Descanso Gardens, just northeast of downtown Los Angeles, is celebrating the 50th year of its Japanese garden. Descanso is embracing the garden’s evolving form, its identity as a focal point for a multi-cultural community and its role in inspiring new artistic creation.  For lovers of camellia, a familiar plant in the Japanese garden, Descanso is home to the largest camellia collection in North America. 

The Japanese garden at the nearby Huntington boasts a history over 100 years as well as a legacy of evolution and renovation seen in its restored Japanese House and a new tea garden. Two other large gardens in the area — the SuiHoen (Garden of Water and Fragrance) in Van Nuys and the Storrier-Stearns Japanese Garden in Pasadena — illustrate how Japanese gardens can demonstrate the sustainable use of water in even an arid climate. All of these gardens feature exceptional garden architecture that makes use of Southern California’s year-round warmth and indoor-outdoor lifestyle.

Happening two weeks after the famous Rose Parade draws throngs to the area, this event provides participants an opportunity to enjoy Southern California climate at its best.  Registration and info here:  http://najga.org/


For more events and opportunities, see

Japanese Gardening Organization’s CALENDAR OF EVENTS

A Word from the Board of Directors

Dear Friend of JGO,

adeane-2016cropMy name is Andrew Deane, and I am a newly-elected director here at the Japanese Gardening Organization. However, I am not new to JGO’s web site, which I first discovered about a decade ago after I moved to Tokyo. Like you, I have a deep and abiding passion for Japanese gardens and Japanese gardening, which in my case was first kindled in the mid-nineties when I traveled to Japan to work as a language instructor. Since then, I have sought opportunities to visit Japanese gardens whenever and wherever I travel, and I have been gradually constructing my own Japanese garden in a quiet suburb of Tokyo. I get such gratification every time I add a new tree or an old stone lantern, and recently I was as giddy as a schoolboy as I watched gardeners add major stonework and a dry pond to my little patch of earth. Like you, I read all the books I can get my hands on, and I visit the best web sites devoted to the field. There are hundreds of such sites on the Internet, but quality sites are not a dime a dozen. Nor do they sprout spontaneously and flourish without effort, energy and support. It is about this latter point which I would like to speak to you today.

The Japanese Gardening Organization was established in 2001 to advance the understanding and appreciation of Japanese gardening and to spread the benefits of Japanese gardening for individuals, groups, communities, and society. It is a non-profit organization run by volunteers featuring resources developed or written voluntarily by professionals and experienced amateurs. Ours is indeed a bold mission, but it is one that we here at JGO take very seriously. We believe that you do too, or you would not be frequenting the web site.

We strive to provide you with resources at all levels and in all categories, and our Forums assure a steady stream of input from a thousand professionals and amateurs on all manner of subjects related to Japanese gardens. In the last year alone, there have been around 800,000 forum page views, and 132 new topics have been added. Several articles on dry landscape gardening and the benefits of gardens to health and the spirit were added to the “Theory and Design” section. The World Japanese Garden Database now holds more than 100 garden references worldwide and continues to grow. Reviews of publications related to Japanese gardens and gardening were also entered into our “Publications” database. These resources continue to provide you with accurate and inspirational information on Japanese gardening.

I would like to single out the addition of Part 1 of A Japanese Garden Handbook, which was added to the organization’s web site in January 2016. I am grateful to the Japanese Gardening Organization for the opportunity to make my research available to a wider public audience, and I look forward to releasing the remaining four parts shortly. Herein lies one of the chief reasons for supporting JGO: the organization values the highest level of accurate and dependable information, and so do you.

So, how will we use your donation? The maintenance of any organization requires ongoing financial commitment, and for a non-profit organization run entirely by volunteers, this means that almost all such financing must come from sponsorship and public support. JGO maintains a web site which incurs annual domain fees and sundry monthly running costs. Regular planned expansion of this site requires upgrading software and hardware and paying additional annual and monthly fees. If you have not already made a donation, please make a secure online gift today by clicking the Donate button above, or send a check to: Japanese Gardening Organization, 7306 N Vandiver Rd, San Antonio, Texas, 78209.

In closing, I would like to extend my general gratitude on behalf of all the directors, honorary directors and advisors here at JGO for you continued interest in this organization, and my particular gratitude for your financial pledge. Your contribution means that we can continue to add material of the very highest caliber to our web site and to fulfill our mission for the mutual benefit of anyone anywhere who shares our passion for Japanese gardens and Japanese gardening.

All the very best,

Andrew R. Deane
Board Director
Tokyo, Japan

 




Japanese Gardening Reference

Japanese toolsLearn how to tie a knot for bamboo fences, or decide what tools you need. JGO Reference section includes articles on theory, design and how-to’s on construction, plants, pruning, lanterns, stones, garden terminology and more.

Gardening Reference Library

Japanese Gardening Forums

Black pine care15,000 entries by 800 Japanese Gardening enthusiasts around the world. The Japanese Garden Forum discussion boards include history, design & construction, maintenance, plants, stone, water, bamboo fences, structures, and more.

The Forums

Events & Education

Bamboo fenceLearn how to work with bamboo, prune pines, or build a Japanese garden in events around the world in the events calendar and via discussions in the Japanese gardening forums.

Events Calendar

Japanese Garden Search

Japanese Garden SearchDiscover Japanese gardens on almost every continent in this comprehensive database.  Search by keywords to narrow your hunt.  Includes location, garden info, photos and more.

Japanese Garden Search

Japanese Garden Publications

Building a library or just researching how to build your dry landscape? Search books and publications on Japanese gardening here.  You can also find reviews on Japanese gardening books and purchase them with a percentage going to support JGO at no addition cost!

Publication Search

Japanese Garden Marketplace

Find Japanese garden tools, garden designers, contractors and suppliers in this resource.  Remember that by using these links and contractors, you are contributing to Japanese Gardening Organization and helping it grow.

Japanese Garden Marketplace

Special Sections

Chaji - A Formal Tea Ceremony

A wonderful five part series on the “Way of Tea” by Elliot Mitchnick, Associate Professor of Urasenke, the 400 year old tradition of Tea headquartered in Kyoto, Japan is presented in Chaji, A Formal Tea Ceremony. (If you have Japanese enabled on your browser, you will see most tea terms with their kanji. In addition, most terms have definitions available by holding your mouse over the word.)

Chaji - Formal Tea Ceremony

Ka-tei, Japanese Architecture, Japanese Garden

The essential relationship between architecture and garden is discussed in Ka-tei,  Japanese Architecture, Japanese Garden.  Japanese carpenter, Chris Hall, gives an overview of the relationships between house and garden in traditional Japanese residential architecture. (If you have Japanese enabled on your browser, you will see most terms with their kanji, and most terms have definitions available by holding your mouse over the word.)

Japanese Architecture-Japanese Garden

Sister City Garden Virtual Tour

A profile of a sister city garden, Kumamoto En Japanese Garden,  created in partnership with Japanese designers and craftsmen and US craftsmen. This is a detailed  walking tour with the names and descriptions of the garden features linked to definitions,  English, Romaji, and Kanji names as well.

Kumamoto-en, Sister City Garden

Doubt ...

Japanese garden designer, Mark Bourne, reflects on his experience as apprentice to a Master gardener in Kyoto in “DOUBT, Learning to see the Japanese Garden.

Doubt by Mark Bourne

US Japanese Gardens Tour

K.T. Cannon-Eger and husband Bill traveled by rail across the United States to visit dozens of Japanese Gardens. Follow their adventure in their blog U.S. Japanese Gardens

US Japanese Gardens Tour

CAN YOU HELP?

The Japanese Gardening Organization (JGO) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization spreading the benefits of Japanese gardening for individuals, groups, communities, and society.  JGO provides educational resources to foster the exchange of culture, knowledge, appreciation and application of Japanese gardening, striving for the highest level of accurate information and resources for Japanese gardening. This organization is supported completely by donations. Your gifts are tax deductible.




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